New issue: Volume Five Number One

History in the Making has a new issue: Volume Five Number One. This new issue continues the journal’s strong record of publishing outstanding work by history students.

This issue focusses on twentieth century European history, with insights from Swatilekha AhmedRebecca Cordony and Joanna Molloy. We also emphasise the role of women in history, most prominently in Michelle Staff’s talented examination of women’s biography.

We’re looking for new members

History in the Making is looking for new members to join our team.

We’re looking for PhD or Honours students in history, who are interested in the behind-the-scenes work involved in running a journal.

Our volunteer team shares our skills and experience to handle the journal’s:

  • liaison with our authors, reviewers, editors, and supporters;
  • graphic design;
  • publishing;
  • social media;
  • website management, and
  • database management.

If you know how to do any these things, or are keen to learn, then we want to hear from you.

The role will be easiest for someone based in Sydney. We meet about once a month, on weekends and weeknights, in Sydney.

If you’re interested in this opportunity, send us an email, telling us about your experience, why you’re interested in joining our team, and the skills that you could bring.

Call for papers

History in the Making is again calling for papers for a new issue. From first-year undergraduates with a fresh perspective on American politics, to Honours students with original research, History in the Making is the journal for up-and-coming history students.

If you have an assignment, thesis extract, or a submission prepared just for History in the Making, now is the time to submit. We will select a group of authors to work with our editors to improve their submissions and prepare them for publication in late 2017.

Submissions close 7 May 2017.

 

 

New issue: Volume 4 Number 2

A new issue of History in the Making is out now

After months of painstaking effort by our authors, editors and reviewers, History in the Making is pleased to announce a new issue. In this issue, the journal maintains its high standard of inquisitive, thoughtful works by undergraduates, complemented and honed by a dedicated team of postgraduates.

Two articles in this issue exemplify the exciting and diverse source material available to undergraduate history students. Rebecca Hart provides a close analysis of death certificates, wills, obituaries and deceased estate files to reveal the very personal experiences of a Victorian family. Hart focuses on the experiences and relationships of prominent women within the family, and uncovers the rich stories that can be found in often-dry legal documents. David Taylor accesses interactions between white Tasmanians and indigenous Australians through Benjamin Duterrau and Thomas Bock’s portrayals of Truggernana, Mannalargenna, George Augustus Robinson and their contemporaries, concluding that there is more to these artworks than meets the eye.

Eighteenth and nineteenth century United States history remains a popular topic for our contributors. Hope Williams recounts the activities of abortionist Ann Lohman, known as ‘Madame Restell’, in nineteenth-century New York City. Her career, the controversy with which it was met, and the media coverage of that controversy, are evaluated as manifestations of contemporary social issues. Peter Harney also accesses the social issues that loomed large in the United States at the turn of the nineteenth century, by examining the transformation of punishment from physical violence to architectural power and surveillance. Harney places that transformation in a broader social context of disease, secularisation and industrialisation.

History in the Making continues to publish strong works examining early modern and ancient periods. Jennifer Lord explores the portrayal of female mystics by male and female hagiographers, to identify attitudes to gender in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. She concludes that these mystics were constructed in a way that accommodated their spirituality within existing power structures. Debbie Turkilsen reaches further back, closely examining the rhetorical devices used by Julius Caesar to persuade his audience in The Civil War. She reveals that the text is indeed rhetorical, intended to communicate Caesar’s attitude towards the controversial events described in his work.

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Submit to History in the Making Vol. 3, No. 1

Call for Papers

Did you write a great essay and would you like to see it published in a journal?  

Do you want to gain experience of the peer review process?

We are currently inviting all students to submit articles for publication – you can submit at any time, but if you submit by 10 October 2013 you will be considered for the next issue, which will be published in March 2014. Find out more about the submission process by clicking here.

If you are an honours or postgraduate student, you can apply to become a reviewer.

Write for our Blog

We are inviting any history student to submit entries to our new blog. Blog posts must be between 200 and 500 words longs and deal with any aspect of history or historical research. Ideas include: book reviews, conference summaries, research tips, stories from the archives or historical anecdotes that you came across in your reading. To make a submission or find out more email: blog@historyitm.org

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Launch of History in the Making Vol. 2, No. 2

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History in the Making Vol.2, No.2 was launched today. Our latest issue features eight outstanding essays from undergraduate and postgraduate history students from across the country, covering a diversity of topics, including women soldiers in the American Civil War, the Australian counter-culture in North Queensland and the role that Vegetarianism played in Victorian debates over animal welfare.

Get Involved!

History students at all levels can get involved with the production of our journal and our blog:

  • Join the editorial collective: We are always on the look-out for keen history students to get involved with running the journal. If you are interested in helping us produce an issue or in getting involved behind the scenes in any other way, please contact us at editors@historyitm.org
  • Become a reviewer: If you are an honours or postgraduate student, you can apply to become a reviewer. To find out more please go to http://www.historyitm.org/hitmJoin.html or email reviewers@historyitm.org

New blog for history students by history students!

Coinciding with the launch of our fourth issue, we are pleased to announce the launch of a new history students’ blog. Please visit our website to find out more: http://www.historyitm.org/

Write for our blog: We are inviting any history student to submit entries to our new blog. Blog posts must be between 200 and 500 words longs and deal with any aspect of history or historical research. Ideas include: book reviews, conference summaries, research tips, stories from the archives or historical anecdotes that you came across in your reading. To make a submission or find out more email: blog@historyitm.org

Call for Papers
Did you write a great essay and would you like to see it published in a journal?  

Do you want to gain experience of the peer review process?

The journal is open to all undergraduate and postgraduate students currently enrolled at an Australian university.  We are currently inviting all students to submit articles for publication – you can submit at any time, but if you submit by 10 October 2013 you will be considered for the next issue.

About

History in the Making is a participatory project which aims to showcase the best historical research being undertaken by history students across Australia. Students at all levels can get involved in this new project by submitting their own work or volunteering to review and edit other students’ work.